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Head Injuries, Stroke & other Neurological Disorders

Current research indicates that approximately 80% of patients that suffer from a Post Traumatic Vision Syndrome are struggling with vision deficits which are a direct result of their injury. Unfortunately, people are often told either that nothing can be done about their symptoms, or that the symptoms will go away over time.

Sometimes visual symptoms might not even appear for days, even weeks after an accident. Some symptoms may last only seconds, while others linger much longer, months and even years. Additionally, some symptoms might disappear after time, such as eye pain or headaches, and yet other symptoms remain, i.e., blurred or doubled vision. Keep in mind, that when someone is experiencing any of the following symptoms they could also have difficulty with reading and learning, as well as balance and movement (such as walking).

Signs and Symptoms of a Vision Problem in PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM POST TRAUMATIC VISION SYNDROME:
Double vision
Headaches
Blurred vision
Dizziness or nausea
Light sensitivity
Attention or concentration difficulties
Staring behavior (low blink rate)
Spatial disorientation
Losing place when reading
Can’t find beginning of next line when reading
Comprehension problems when reading
Visual memory problems
Pulls away from objects when they are brought close to them
Eye turn in, out, up or down
Difficulty shifting focus from near to far
Words move or blur when reading
Objects appear to move
Unstable peripheral vision
Associated neuromotor difficulties with balance, coordination and posture
Perceived movement of stationary objects
Consistently stays to one side of hallway or room
Bumps into objects when walking
Poor walking or posture: leans back on heels, forward, or to one side when walking, standing or seated in a chair
Perception of the floor being tilted
Dizziness or nausea
Spatial disorientation
Consistently stays to one side of hallway or room
Bumps into objects when walking
Poor walking or posture: leans back on heels, forward, or to one side when walking, standing or seated in a chair
Perception of the floor being tilted
Associated neuromotor difficulties with balance, coordination and posture